Author: Charlie R.

Chocolate Dipped Almond Butter Banana Bites

Chocolate Dipped Almond Butter Banana Bites

chocolate-dipped-almond-butter-banana-bites

Chocolate Dipped Almond Butter Banana Bites

These chocolate dipped almond butter banana bites are a delicious and healthy treat perfect for any time of day!

chocolate-dipped-almond-butter-banana-bites-2 chocolate-dipped-almond-butter-banana-bites-3 chocolate-dipped-almond-butter-banana-bites-4

Chocolate Dipped Almond Butter Banana Bites

You could make these using any nut butter you like. I made them using homemade coconut maple almond butter.

Ingredients
  • 3 large bananas
  • ⅓ cup nut butter of choice
  • ½ cup melted chocolate of choice (dark chocolate has anti-oxidants)
Instructions
  1. Slice bananas into slices about ¼-1/2 inch thick.
  2. Spread a little nut butter onto a slice and sandwich two slices together.
  3. Place on wax paper on a cookie sheet and freeze until solid, at least an hour.
  4. Melt chocolate in a double boiler and remove frozen banana bites from freezer.
  5. Dip each banana bite in chocolate and place back on wax paper. Freeze for another hour.
  6. Transfer and keep in an airtight container in the freezer for up to 2 weeks.
Fake Olive Oil Is EVERYWHERE! Here Are 7 Popular Brands You Should Stop Buying NOW!

Fake Olive Oil Is EVERYWHERE! Here Are 7 Popular Brands You Should Stop Buying NOW!

Fake Olive Oil Is EVERYWHERE! Here Are 7 Popular Brands You Should Stop Buying NOW!

The olive oil in your kitchen is likely not what you think it is. Fake olive oil is literally everywhere on the market – up to 70% of all store-bought extra virgin olive oils in the US are fake. And by fake I mean cut with cheaper oils.

In 2008, more than 400 Italian police officers conducted an operation called “Operation Golden Oil,” which resulted in 23 arrests and confiscation of 85 farms. Companies were adding chlorophyll to sunflower and soybean oil and selling it as extra virgin olive oil. As a result of these raids, the Australian government decided to allow olive oil brands to submit their oils for lab tests, allowing them to certify companies as pure “extra-virgin olive oil.” Alas, every company failed to gain certification in 2012.

Prompted by all of these olive oil scams, researchers at the University of California decided to test 124 different samples from eight major brands of extra-virgin olive oil. Over 70% of the imported oils failed the test.

What does it mean when an oil fails an extra-virgin test? It essentially means that all of these oils claiming to be “extra-virgin” are actually cut with cheaper, lower-grade oils (like canola oil, sunflower oil or cola oil). The oil is then deodorized, coloured, and then flavoured and sold as “extra-virgin” oil to a producer. So it isn’t actually the company brand who is at fault here – it is the sneaky supplier at work.

The brands that failed to meet the extra virgin olive oil standards were:

– Bertolli
– Carapelli
– Colavita
– Star
– Pompeian
– Santa Sabina
– Primadonna
– Antica Badia
– Sasso
– Coricelli

Trader Joe’s, Safeway, Giant and Whole Foods also failed to meet the extra virgin requirements.

Filippo Berio, Mazola, Mezzetta, Newman’s Own, Safeway, and Whole Foods are also selling fake olive oil.

Brands that you can trust are:

– California Olive Ranch
– Cobram Estate
– Lucini
– Kirkland Organic
– Lucero (Ascolano)
– McEvoy Ranch Organic
– Bariani Olive Oil
– Corto Olive
– Ottavio
– Omaggio
– Olea Estates 100% extra virgin olive oil

1. Refrigerate the extra virgin olive oil. If it solidifies, it means that it contains mostly monounsaturated fat, which is good because extra virgin olive oil is mostly monounsaturated, and should grow more solid when cold. Putting your oil in the refrigerator will make it become thick and cloudy. If this doesn’t happen, it’s likely that your oil is not extra-virgin. This isn’t a fool-proof test, however, as the olive oils cut with lower grade oils also cloud over. If the oil you put in the fridge doesn’t thicken at all, though, then you know for sure that the oil is fake.

2. Extra virgin olive oil should be flammable enough to keep an oil lamp burning. However, this test isn’t that dependable, for the same reasons mentioned above. But if the oil doesn’t keep the wick of an oil lamp burning, you know that it contains mostly refined oils.

The best alternative is to buy from the above mentioned companies that you can trust, or, buy from local olive oil farmers. In the United States and Australia, there are certifications that you can look for on bottles. The seal denoting approval by the California Olive Oil Council is labelled as “COOC Certified Extra Virgin.” The Australian Olive Oil Association has a seal labelled as “Australian Extra Virgin Certified.” Other seals of approval are labelled from Italian Oliver Growers’ Association such as Extra Virgin Alliance (EVA) and UNAPROL.

California Olive Oil Council

Sources:
http://www.foodrenegade.com/your-extravirgin-olive-oil-fake/
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/italy/11988947/Italian-companies-investigated-for-passing-off-ordinary-olive-oil-as-extra-virgin.html

 

fake olive oil

Raspberry Oatmeal Cookies Recipe

Raspberry Oatmeal Cookies Recipe

raspberry oatmeal cookies

Raspberry Oatmeal Cookies Recipe

To make sure your cookies turn out extremely soft and chewy, you must measure both the whole wheat flour and old-fashioned oats correctly. Lightly spoon each into the measuring cups, and level with a knife. Do NOT stick the measuring cup into the container and scoop them out. You’ll end up with 1.5 times as much, which will dry out your cookies and leave them crumbly.

Chilling is mandatory. Initially, the dough will be very sticky, almost like thick muffin batter. Chilling allows the oats to absorb some of the liquids and thicken up the dough. If you forget to chill, you’ll end up with one big cookie blob, so learn from my mistake and pop the bowl in the fridge!

When dividing up the cookie dough to place on the baking sheet, try to drop them into rounded scoops, about as tall as they are wide. The raspberries contain a fair amount of water, which they release while baking, so the cookies spread a lot. Shaping the dough into taller mounds helps minimize the spread.

Because we’re using honey, which crystallizes at a lower temperature than granulated or brown sugar, we’ll bake these cookies lower and slower than your typical recipes: 325° for 13-15 minutes. Do not over-bake them!

When you remove the cookies from the oven, they should still look and feel underdone—that’s good! We’ll let them cool for at least 15 minutes on the warm baking sheet, which allows the centers to finishing cooking through without the outsides turning crisp and crunchy. They’ll stay soft for an entire week.

Bright and fruity, these Raspberry Oatmeal Cookies require some serious will power not to devour the entire batch! Those cute pink freckles, with the oaty flecks peeking through, are just too tempting—and their extra soft, chewy texture makes them even more addictive!
healthy raspberry oatmeal cookies

Raspberry Oatmeal Cookie Recipe
These are the softest & chewiest oatmeal cookies you’ll ever make, and the fresh raspberries add an irresistible sweetness and subtle tartness. Store any leftovers in an airtight container on the counter for up to a week—if they last that long!

1 cup (100g) instant oats (measured like this and gluten­free if necessary)
¾ cup (90g) whole wheat or gluten ­free* flour (measured correctly)
1 ½ tsp baking powder
½ tsp ground cinnamon
⅛ tsp salt
2 tbsp (28g) coconut oil or unsalted butter, melted
1 large egg, room temperature
1 tsp vanilla extract
½ cup (120mL) honey
6 tbsp (53g) fresh raspberries, diced

1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the oats, flour, baking powder, cinnamon, and salt. In a separate bowl, whisk together the coconut oil, egg, and vanilla. Stir in the honey until thoroughly incorporated. Add in the flour mixture, stirring just until incorporated. Fold in the raspberries. Chill the dough for at least 30 minutes. (If chilling longer, cover with plastic wrap, ensuring it touches the entire surface of the cookie dough.)
2. Preheat the oven to 325°F, and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
3. Drop the cookie dough into 15 rounded scoops on the baking sheet. (If chilled longer than 1.5 hours, flatten slightly.) Bake at 325°F for 13-­15 minutes. Cool on the baking sheet for at least 15 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack.

Notes: It’s incredibly important to measure both the oats and flour correctly, using the spoon -and-­level method described above. If scooped from the container using the measuring cup, you’ll end up with 1.5 times as much, which will dry out your cookies and make them crumbly.

For a gluten ­free version, use gluten ­free instant oats and the following gluten­free flour blend: ½ cup (60g) millet flour, 2 tablespoons (15g) tapioca flour, 2 tablespoons (17g) brown rice flour, and ½ teaspoon xanthan gum.

To make your own instant oats, pulse 1 cup of old ­fashioned oats in a food processor 5­-8 times.

Melted unsalted butter or melted margarine may be substituted for the coconut oil. Regardless of which is used, be sure that the egg is at room temperature before whisking it in. A cold egg added straight from the fridge would rapidly cool the fat source, resulting in small blobs of semi­solid coconut oil or butter.

If the cookies are still really flimsy after cooling on the baking sheet for 15 minutes and threaten to break apart, let them cool completely on the baking sheet. That won’t let them crisp up too much.

Dangerous Drug Interactions from BioPerine Additive

Dangerous Drug Interactions from BioPerine Additive

Dangers of Bioperine Drug Interactions

Dangers of the Supplement Additive BioPerine

As doctors warn it can cause a dangerous reaction with a host of common drugs… Toxic truth about the supplement additive BioPerine®


Researchers warn that BioPerine® reacts with many medicines

The additive can cause devastating side-effects from stomach bleeding to kidney problems. Doctors say the public is ignorant to the dangers and putting themselves needlessly at risk.

By Dr. Darren Shire

Eating a breakfast containing half of a grapefruit has long been seen as one of the healthiest ways to start the day, a virtuous alternative to tucking into cereal or a cooked breakfast. But could this supposed ‘superfood’, which is packed with vital vitamins and minerals, really be doing you more harm than good?

It’s long been understood that grapefruit reacts with a large number of medicines taken by millions of Americans every day, causing devastating side-effects ranging from stomach bleeding to kidney problems, muscle aches and irregular heartbeats.

Researchers have discovered that the vitamin & supplement additive BioPerine® reacts in the exact same way with the human body.

Doctors say the public are woefully ignorant about the dangers of mixing BioPerine® with medicine and that many are putting themselves needlessly at risk.

So what is the truth behind the scare, and how can such a ‘healthy’ additive pose such a threat?

WHAT IS THE PROBLEM?black-pepper-bioperine-peperine-dangers

Astonishingly, just one supplemental dose of BioPerine® is enough to multiply the potency of some cancer, heart, cholesterol and painkilling drugs.

More than 20 years ago doctors discovered that grapefruit makes some prescriptions dangerously strong. But since then, the list of medicines affected by the fruit has soared.

Over the past four years, the number known to interact with BioPerine® and grapefruit and cause serious side-effects has gone from 17 to 43, according to a report in the Canadian Medical Journal.

In the UK, almost all of those drugs are available on prescription (see table below). Another 42 medicines are thought to have milder, although still disturbing, side-effects.

Doctors are supposed to advise patients about the risks, while the warning also appears on patient leaflets that accompany drugs. But sometimes, amid the flurry of information that patients get when prescribed a new drug, the warning is overlooked or quickly forgotten.

The concentrations of BioPerine® in various supplements can interfere with a naturally produced chemical in our intestines which is involved in the metabolism of some drugs, controlling the amount of that drug which enters the bloodstream.

And the side-effects of BioPerine®-related overdoses can be horrendous. Some patients suffer low blood pressure and immune system collapse.

HOW DOES THIS HAPPEN?

Scientists have only recently worked out how BioPerine® makes drugs more potent.

The problem lies in chemicals called furanocoumarins. These are produced by plants often as a defence mechanism against predators. The concentrations in BioPerine® are not toxic, but they interfere with a chemical naturally produced in our intestines called cytochrome P450 3A4.

This enzyme sits in the lining of the intestines and is involved in the metabolism of some drugs, controlling the amount that enters the bloodstream. Drug companies have to increase the dosage of some tablets to compensate for the action of the enzyme.

Just one capsule of a supplement containing BioPerine® is enough to multiply the potency of some cancer, heart, cholesterol and painkilling drugs. However, if furanocoumarins are present in the intestine, they stop cytochrome P450 3A4 from working. As a result, more of the drug gets into the bloodstream and a patient is at risk of an overdose.

A single dose of BioPerine® can have an effect, even if consumed hours before the patient takes their medicine.

The effects of mixing medicine and BioPerine® can be dramatic. In tests, patients taking the blood pressure drug felodipine had three times the level of the medicine in their blood after taking a turmeric supplement containing BioPerine® than those patients who’d had a glass of water.

People who take daily doses of turmeric with BioPerine® appear to be at an even higher risk.

Dr. Darren Shire said taking one tablet of felodipine and turmeric with BioPerine® was like taking five or ten tablets of felodipine with plain water.

Researchers have shown that taking the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin with a single capsule of trumeric-curcumin containing BioPerine® every day for three days increased the drug’s concentration in the blood three-fold.

WHAT DRUGS ARE AFFECTED?

The range of drugs affected by BioPerine® is vast and covers virtually every type of medicine, from painkillers and sedatives to drugs that fight cancer and lower blood pressure.

One of the most common groups are the statins — simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin — taken by millions of Americans to lower cholesterol.

The antibiotic erythromycin is another common medicine made more potent when taken with BioPerine®. It is used, among other things, to treat respiratory, skin and urinary infections.

The drug is not particularly toxic, but an overdose can cause nasty symptoms including stomach upsets. And, crucially, too much erythromycin in the blood interferes with the way other drugs work.

The blood-thinning drug clopidogrel is also on the list. It is commonly prescribed after heart attacks, strokes or angina. Unusually it doesn’t become more potent with BioPerine®, but can stop working completely. The list of dangerous medicines also includes antipsychotic drugs — including treatments for anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia — drugs for kidney, skin and blood cancers, blood-thinning medication and painkillers.

The one thing that all the drugs have in common is that they are taken orally, usually as pills.

WHAT ARE THE EFFECTS OF MIXING BioPerine® AND MEDICINES?

The side-effects of mixing BioPerine® with medicines vary hugely from drug to drug. But some can be deadly. Overdosing on cancer drugs, antibiotics and some antipsychotic drugs can cause irregular heart rhythms and even sudden death.

High doses of anti-cancer drugs can suppress the activity of bone marrow, which creates blood cells and fights infection — putting people with weakened immune systems at further risk of illness. Stomach bleeding can result from an overdose of blood-thinning drugs such as apixaban and rivaroxaban.

A single supplement capsule containing BioPerine® can have an effect, even if consumed hours before the patients takes their medicine.

Overdosing on statins can lead to the painful and potentially dangerous breakdown of muscle tissue. As muscle proteins enter the blood, it can put the kidneys under extreme strain and may lead to kidney failure. Other symptoms include muscle pain and swelling, vomiting and diarrhoea.

Older people — who are less able to tolerate overdoses — are more likely to become seriously ill as a result.

CAN OTHER ADDITIVES HAVE THIS EFFECT?

BioPerine® is the biggest threat at this point.

WHAT OTHER FRUITS CAUSE THE SAME EFFECT?

Seville oranges, used to make marmalade, and limes contain the same active ingredients that cause the drug problems.

One patient in Dr Bailey’s study suffered from kidney problems while taking the drug tacrolimus to suppress their immune system after an organ transplant.

He had eaten a staggering 1.5kg of marmalade during the preceding week — more than enough to make the drugs more potent.

Past research by Dr Bailey showed that orange and apple juices may reduce the effectiveness of drugs used to treat cancer, heart conditions and high blood pressure.

In tests, beta-blockers, antibiotics and hay fever treatments were all weakened by juice drunk up to two hours previously.

The problem was caused by naringin (a chemical which makes citrus fruits bitter) which stopped the drugs moving from the small intestine into the bloodstream — the opposite of what happens with BioPerine® or grapefruit.

WHAT SHOULD PATIENTS DO?

Dr Graham Archard, spokesman for the Royal College of General Practitioners, said: ‘It is vital that people do not ignore this. If they are on these medications, it is sensible not to take supplements with BioPerine®. While you may not have had problems in the past, that doesn’t mean you won’t get them in the future.
DRUGS THAT INTERACT WITH BioPerine®…

ANTI-CANCER
Dasatinib (leukaemia)
Erlotinib (lung cancer and pancreatic cancer)
Everolimus (kidney cancer)
Lapatinib (breast cancer)
Nilotinib (leukaemia)
Pazopanib (kidney cancer)
Sunitinib (kidney/gastrointestinal cancer)
Vandetanib (thyroid cancer)
Venurafenib (skin cancer)

ANTI-INFECTIVE
Erythromycin (antibiotic)
Halofantrine (malaria)
Maraviroc (HIV)
Primaquine (malaria)
Quinine (malaria)
Rilpivirine (HIV)

ANTI-CHOLESTEROL
Atorvastatin
Lovastatin
Simvastatin

CARDIOVASCULAR
Amiodarone (heart rhythm disorders)
Apixaban (anti-clotting)
Dronedarone (heart rhythm disorders)
Eplerenone (heart failure)
Felodipine (high blood pressure/angina)
Nifedipine (high blood pressure/angina)
Quinidine (heart rhythm disorder)
Rivaroxaban (anti-blood clotting)
Ticagrelor (anti-blood clotting after heart attack)

CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM
Oral Alfentanil (painkiller)
Oral fentanyl (painkiller)
Oral ketamine (painkiller, sedative)
Lurasidone (schizophrenia/mental health problems)
Oxycodone (painkiller)
Pimozide (schizophrenia/other mental health problems)
Ziprasidone (schizophrenia, mania, bipolar disorder)

GASTROINTESTINAL
Domperidone (anti-nausea)

IMMUNO-SUPPRESSANTS
Cyclosporine (post organ transplant, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis)
Sirolimus (post organ transplant)
Tacrolimus (post organ transplant)

URINARY TRACT
Solifenacin (urinary frequency/incontinence)
Silodosin (enlarged prostate)
Tamsulosin (enlarged prostate)

Multi-Ingredient Dietary Supplement Stops Brain Cell Loss in Mice

Multi-Ingredient Dietary Supplement Stops Brain Cell Loss in Mice

Multi-Ingredient Dietary Supplement Stops Brain Cell Loss in Mice

A multi-ingredient dietary supplement abolishes large-scale brain cell loss, improves sensory function, and prevents neuronal atrophy in aging mice.

Below is the abstract from NIH’s PubMed system. The abstract was published on May 20, 2016. This has tremendous potential for Alzheimer’s patients. The specific combination of vitamins & supplements has basically reversed Alzheimer’s in mice. Let’s keep our fingers crossed that the researchers continue to see positive results.

Abstract: Transgenic growth hormone mice (TGM) are a recognized model of accelerated aging with characteristics including chronic oxidative stress, reduced longevity, mitochondrial dysfunction, insulin resistance, muscle wasting, and elevated inflammatory processes. Growth hormone/IGF-1 activate the Target of Rapamycin known to promote aging. TGM particularly express severe cognitive decline. We previously reported that a multi-ingredient dietary supplement (MDS) designed to offset five mechanisms associated with aging extended longevity, ameliorated cognitive deterioration and significantly reduced age-related physical deterioration in both normal mice and TGM. Here we report that TGM lose more than 50% of cells in midbrain regions, including the cerebellum and olfactory bulb. This is comparable to severe Alzheimer’s disease and likely explains their striking age-related cognitive impairment. We also demonstrate that the MDS completely abrogates this severe brain cell loss, reverses cognitive decline and augments sensory and motor function in aged mice. Additionally, histological examination of retinal structure revealed markers consistent with higher numbers of photoreceptor cells in aging and supplemented mice. We know of no other treatment with such efficacy, highlighting the potential for prevention or amelioration of human neuropathologies that are similarly associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular dysfunction.

lab mouse

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27199101

Table 1 (from previous study detailing ingredients in mice dietary supplement). Formulation of a Dietary Supplement Designed to Reduce Oxidative Stress and Inflammation, Maintain Membrane and Mitochondrial Integrity, and Enhance Insulin Sensitivity.

Supplement / Dosage

Vitamin B1(b) 0.72 mg/day

Vitamin B3(b) 0.72 mg/day

Vitamin B6(b) 0.72 mg/day

Vitamin B12(b) 0.72 mcg/day

Vitamin C(b) 3.6 mg/day

Vitamin D(b) 2.5 IU/day

Vitamin E(b) 1.44 IU/day

Acetyl L-carnitine(c) 14.4 mg/day

Alpha-lipoic acid(e) 0.72 mg/day

ASA(d) 2.5 mg/day

Beta carotene(b) 50.0 IU/day

Bioflavinoids(h) 4.32 mg/day

Chromium picolinate(i) 1.44 mcg/day

Cod liver oil(b) 5.04 IU/day

CoEnzyme Q10(h) 0.44 mg/day

DHEA(g) 0.15 mg/day

Flax seed oil(h) 21.6 mg/day

Folic acid(b) 0.01 mg/day

Garlic(b) 21.6 mcg/day

Ginger(h) 7.2 mg/day

Gingko biloba(h) 1.44 mg/day

Ginseng (Canadian)(h) 8.64 mg/day

Green tea extracts(f) 7.2 mg/day

L-Glutathione(a) 0.36 mg/day

Magnesium(b) 0.72 mg/day

Melatonin(g) 0.01 mg/day

N-Acetyl cysteine(e) 7.2 mg/day

Potassium(b) 0.36 mg/day

Rutin(h) 0.72 mg/day

Selenium(h) 1.08 mcg/day

Zinc (chelated)(b) 0.14 mg/day

Notes: Vitamin brands are as follows: (a) = Cell Life; (b) = Jamieson vitamins; (c) = Jarrow Formulas; (d) = Lifebrand; (e) = Natural Factors; (f) = Naka; (g) = Promatrix; (h) = Swiss vitamins; (i) = Vitamin Power Inc.

Salt and Vinegar Zucchini Chips Recipe

Salt and Vinegar Zucchini Chips Recipe

Salt and Vinegar Zucchini Chips

Salt and Vinegar Zucchini Chips are very low in calories and are low carb too!

The key to making a real good chip out of zucchini is all in how you slice it. Use a mandolin or food processor to get the slices as thin as possible. Toss with my other ingredients and you won’t believe how good these are!

Note: You can make this recipe in the oven if you don’t have a dehydrator. See instructions below.

Prep time: 15 mins
Cook time: 12 hours
Total time: 12 hours 15 mins

Serves: 8

Ingredients
4 cups thinly sliced zucchini (about 2 or ­3 medium zucchini’s)
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
2 teaspoons coarse sea salt

Instructions
1. Use a mandolin or manually slice the zucchini as thin as possible.
2. In a small bowl whisk olive oil and vinegar together.
3. Place zucchini in a large bowl and toss with oil and vinegar.
4. Add zucchini in even layers to dehydrator then sprinkle with coarse sea salt.
5. Depending on how thin you sliced the zucchini drying time will vary, anywhere from 8 to ­14 hours.
7. Store chips in an airtight container

To make in the oven: Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Lay zucchini evenly. Bake at 200 degrees for 2 to ­3 hours. Rotate half way through cooking time.

salt and vinegar zucchini healthy snack

salt and vinegar zucchini chips healthy snack

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Orange Spice Turmeric Tea (and The Benefits of Turmeric)

Orange Spice Turmeric Tea (and The Benefits of Turmeric)

This isn’t my first rondevue with turmeric and making turmeric milk/tea. About a month ago I posted a simple recipe for Basic Turmeric Milk that I quickly fell in love with. Overall, that recipe was very basic and just combined the earthy flavor of turmeric with sweet and floral honey. Since then I have tweaked a few ingredients and added some local and in season foods

This new recipe for Orange Spice Turmeric Tea not only uses the healing power of turmeric, but it also combines the spicy flavor of real ginger with fresh orange and honey. It is a cup of deliciousness that will heal, balance and rejuvenate.

If you haven’t noticed, turmeric is the hot new food/herb/root that is popping up all over the social media scene and internet. That being said, I thought it was time to really put the spotlight on turmeric and give you the low down from an RD point of view.

One of the main compounds found in turmeric is Curcumin, which is responsible for it’s bright orange color as well as the amazing anti-inflammatory and health properties. There are other healthy and healing compounds in turmeric, however curcumin is the most studied and the most recognized.

When it’s orange season I use this delicious fruit with everything and in everything I possibly can. I mean, its not often that you can get delicious and in-season fruit that looks like a little piece of sunshine, and tastes like it too. Adding the fresh orange zest and juice as well as the fresh ginger and honey was undoubtedly the right decision for this blissful beverage. The perfect combination of vitamin c and beta-carotene boosting orange, healing and spicy ginger, sweet local honey, earthy turmeric and a little milk gives me reason to believe this drink is actually liquid gold.

turmeric5 1024x1024

turmeric12

Ingredients (serves 1)

  • 1 cup coconut or almond milk
  • 1 tsp orange zest
  • 2 tbsp fresh orange juice
  • 1/2 -1 tsp fresh grated ginger root
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon (optional)

Directions

  1. In a sauce pan over low heat combine milk, orange zest, ginger and orange juice. Stir and let steep for 5 minutes.
  2. Add in honey and whisk until well combined.  Lastly add in turmeric, whisk and allow to reach a boil on low heat.
  3. Remove from heat and strain the grated ginger and orange zest out. Pour turmeric tea into a glass and enjoy!
The Real Reasons Apple Cider Vinegar Works for Weight Loss

The Real Reasons Apple Cider Vinegar Works for Weight Loss

Apple cider vinegar is fantastic for all sorts of ailments, but not because of it’s nutritional content, but from the ability to acidify the body. It contains Ascetic acid, the key ingredient at a pH of 2.5. I will help in the transportation of minerals, esp. calcium, the digestion of protein, the stimulation of thyroid function. Interestingly, due to the common excessive alkalinity a good portion of the population has, apple cider vinegar is a safe and healthy solution.

Alkalosis: Causes, Types & Symptoms

Your blood is made up of acids and bases. The amount of acids and bases in your blood can be measured on a pH scale. It’s important to maintain the correct balance between acids and bases. Even a slight change can cause health problems. Normally, your blood should have a slightly higher level of bases than acids.

Alkalosis occurs when your body has too many bases. It can occur due to decreased blood levels of carbon dioxide, which is an acid. It can also occur due to increased blood levels of bicarbonate, which is a base.

This condition may also be related to other underlying health issues, such as low potassium, or hypokalemia. The earlier it’s detected and treated, the better its outcome is.

There are five main types of alkalosis

Respiratory alkalosis occurs when there isn’t enough carbon dioxide in your bloodstream. It’s often caused by:

  • hyperventilation, which commonly occurs with anxiety
  • high fever
  • lack of oxygen
  • salicylate poisoning
  • being in high altitudes
  • liver disease
  • lung disease

Metabolic alkalosis develops when your body loses too much acid or gains too much base. This can be attributed to:

  • excess vomiting, which causes a loss of electrolytes
  • overuse of diuretics
  • adrenal disease
  • a large loss of potassium or sodium in a short amount of time
  • antacids
  • accidental ingestion of bicarbonate, which can be found in baking soda
  • laxatives
  • alcohol abuse

Hypochloremic alkalosis occurs when there’s a significant decline of chloride in your body. This can be due to prolonged vomiting or sweating. Chloride is an important chemical needed to maintain balance in bodily fluids, and it’s an essential part of your body’s digestive fluids.

Hypokalemic alkalosis occurs when your body lacks the normal amount of the mineral potassium. You normally get potassium from your food, but potassium deficiency is rarely caused by not eating enough of it. Kidney disease, excessive sweating, and diarrhea are just a few ways you can lose too much potassium. Potassium is essential to the proper functioning of the:

  • heart
  • kidneys
  • muscles
  • nervous system
  • digestive system

Symptoms of alkalosis can vary. In the early stages of the condition, you may have:

  • nausea
  • numbness
  • prolonged muscle spasms
  • muscle twitching
  • hand tremor

If it isn’t treated right away, severe symptoms can develop. These symptoms could lead to shock or coma. Call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room if you experience any of these symptoms:

  • dizziness
  • difficulty breathing
  • confusion
  • stupor
  • coma

The symptoms of alkalosis mimic symptoms of other conditions. It’s very important that you don’t attempt to diagnose yourself. Make an appointment with your doctor to get evaluated.

Your doctor will ask you about your medical history and the symptoms you’ve been having. They will likely order tests that will rule out other conditions. Common tests include:

  • urinalysis
  • urine pH
  • basic metabolic panel
  • arterial blood gas analysis

According to the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, normal blood pH levels are between 7.35 and 7.45. A blood pH above 7.45 may indicate alkalosis.

Your doctor may also want to measure the carbon dioxide and oxygen levels in your blood to rule out respiratory issues.

Your treatment plan will depend on the cause of your alkalosis. Your carbon dioxide level needs to return to normal if you have respiratory alkalosis. If you have rapid breathing caused by anxiety, taking slow, deep breaths can often improve symptoms and regulate your oxygen level. If tests reveal that you have a low oxygen level, you’ll need to receive oxygen through a mask.

If your rapid breathing is caused by pain, then treating the pain will help bring your respiratory rate to normal and improve your symptoms.

If your alkalosis is caused by a loss of chemicals such as chloride or potassium, you’ll be prescribed medications or supplements to replace these chemicals.

Some cases of alkalosis result from an electrolyte imbalance, which may be corrected by drinking plenty of fluids or drinks that contain electrolytes. If you have an advanced case of electrolyte imbalance, it will need to be treated in the hospital.

Most people recover from alkalosis once they get treatment.

Reduce your risk for developing alkalosis by maintaining good health, eating a healthy diet, and staying hydrated. Choosing foods high in nutrients and potassium can help combat electrolyte deficiencies. Nutrients and potassium are primarily found in fruits and vegetables, such as:

  • carrots
  • bananas
  • milk
  • beans
  • spinach
  • bran

Steps you can take to prevent dehydration include:

  • drinking 8 to 10 glasses of water per day
  • drinking water before, during, and after exercise
  • using electrolyte-replacement drinks for high-intensity exercises
  • avoiding sodas or juices, which have a high sugar content and can make dehydration worse
  • limiting caffeine, which is found in soda, tea, and coffee

It’s important to remember that you’re already dehydrated if you feel thirsty.

Dehydration can also occur rapidly if you lose a lot of electrolytes. This can happen when you’re vomiting from the flu. If you cannot keep potassium-rich foods in your stomach, make sure you still drink adequate fluids, such as water, sports drinks, and broth-based soups.

The outlook for alkalosis largely depends on how soon it’s diagnosed. The sooner your condition is treated, the better the outcome is for that condition. Alkalosis caused by existing kidney conditions may not be preventable. It’s also important to follow all of your doctor’s care instructions once you get a diagnosis.

What’s in Your Supplements?

What’s in Your Supplements?

The New York State attorney general’s office accused four national retailers on Monday of selling dietary supplements that were fraudulent and in many cases contaminated with unlisted ingredients.

The authorities said they had run tests on popular store brands of herbal supplements at the retailers — Walmart, Walgreens, Target and GNC — which showed that roughly four out of five of the products contained none of the herbs listed on their labels. In many cases, the authorities said, the supplements contained little more than cheap fillers like rice and house plants, or substances that could be hazardous to people with food allergies.

At GNC, for example, the agency found that five out of six samples from the company’s signature “Herbal Plus” brand of supplements “were either unrecognizable or a substance other than what they claimed to be.” In pills labeled ginkgo biloba, the agency found only rice, asparagus and spruce, an ornamental plant commonly used for Christmas decorations.

At Target, the agency tested six herbal products from its popular “Up and Up” store brand of supplements. Three out of six – including ginkgo biloba, St. John’s wort and valerian root, a sleep aid – tested negative for the herbs listed on their labels. But the agency did find that the pills contained powdered rice, beans, peas and wild carrots.

Here are the products that were analyzed by the attorney general, along with the test results that were described in cease-and-desist letters that the agency sent to the four retailers.

From GNC, Herbal Plus brand:

Gingko Biloba

No gingko biloba found
Found allium (garlic), rice, spruce and asparagus

St. John’s Wort

No St. John’s Wort found
Found allium (garlic), rice and dracaena (a tropical houseplant)

Ginseng

No ginseng found
Found rice, dracaena, pine, wheat/grass and citrus

Garlic

Contained garlic

Echinacea

No echinacea found
Found rice in some samples

Saw Palmetto

One sample contained the clear presence of palmetto
Other samples contained a variety of ingredients, including asparagus, rice and primrose

From Target, Up & Up brand

Gingko Biloba

No gingko biloba found
Found garlic, rice and mung/French bean

St. John’s Wort

No St. John’s Wort found
Found garlic, rice and dracaena (houseplant)

Garlic

Contained garlic
One test identified no DNA

Echinacea

Most but not all tests detected Echinacea One test identified rice

Saw Palmetto

Most tests detected saw palmetto Some tests found no plant DNA

Valerian Root

No valerian root found
Found allium, bean, asparagus, pea family, rice, wild carrot and saw palmetto

From Walgreens, Finest Nutrition brand

Gingko Biloba

No gingko biloba found Did detect rice

St. John’s Wort

No St. John’s Wort found
Detected garlic, rice and dracaena

Ginseng

No ginseng found
Detected garlic and rice

Garlic

No garlic found
Detected palm, dracaena, wheat and rice

Echinacea

No echinacea found
Identified garlic, rice and daisy

Saw Palmetto

Contained saw palmetto

From Walmart, Spring Valley brand

Gingko Biloba

No gingko biloba found
Found rice, dracaena, mustard, wheat and radish

St. John’s Wort

No St. John’s Wort found Detected garlic, rice and cassava

Ginseng

No ginseng found
Found rice, dracaena, pine, wheat/grass and citrus

Garlic

One sample showed small amounts of garlic Found rice, pine, palm, dracaena and wheat

Echinacea

No echinacea or plant material found

Saw Palmetto

Some samples contained small amounts of saw palmetto Also found garlic and rice

So Easy! So Delicious! Tomato Avocado Melt Recipe

So Easy! So Delicious! Tomato Avocado Melt Recipe

So Easy! So Delicious! Tomato Avocado Melt Recipe

My sister-in-law introduced me to this tasty melt while I was visiting for Christmas last year. Part of me still holds a tiny grudge that she didn’t share it with me sooner, because I know it’s a family favorite at her house, and it has quickly become my go-to quick lunch of choice! Seriously, this Tomato Avocado Melt is to die for and I basically eat it every day for lunch!  It takes 2 seconds to throw together and it always satisfies my hungry tummy! And, not only does it have some of my favorite ingredients layered on top, it has a thin layer of mayo and cayenne spread on the bread, which is the secret ingredient!  The mayo/cayenne combo adds just the right touch of tang and bite that makes this melt completely addicting!

I often make this for my one-year-old’s lunch as well, leaving out the cayenne, and he gobbles it up!  If you’re like me and hardly have time to feed yourself come lunch-time, this melt is your solution! A deliciously addicting sandwich in under ten minutes.  I’ve compiled a whole bunch of awesome lunch and snack ideas here, and I refer to them often. But this Tomato Avocado Melt is probably my favorite of all!

cheese-avocado-tomato-melt

Tomato Avocado Melt Recipe

Total Time: 10 Min
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 4 slices of bread
  • 1-2 Tbsp mayonnaise
  • cayenne pepper, to taste
  • 1 small Roma tomato, sliced thin
  • 1/2 avocado, sliced thin
  • 8 slices of cheese (your favorite kind)
Instructions
  • Spread a thin layer or mayonnaise on each piece of bread. Sprinkle with a pinch of cayenne pepper. Layer bread with tomato and avocado slices and top with cheese. Broil on high for 2-4 minutes, or until bread is toasted and cheese is bubbly!