Category: Healthy Eating

Salt and Vinegar Zucchini Chips Recipe

Salt and Vinegar Zucchini Chips Recipe

Salt and Vinegar Zucchini Chips

Salt and Vinegar Zucchini Chips are very low in calories and are low carb too!

The key to making a real good chip out of zucchini is all in how you slice it. Use a mandolin or food processor to get the slices as thin as possible. Toss with my other ingredients and you won’t believe how good these are!

Note: You can make this recipe in the oven if you don’t have a dehydrator. See instructions below.

Prep time: 15 mins
Cook time: 12 hours
Total time: 12 hours 15 mins

Serves: 8

Ingredients
4 cups thinly sliced zucchini (about 2 or ­3 medium zucchini’s)
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
2 teaspoons coarse sea salt

Instructions
1. Use a mandolin or manually slice the zucchini as thin as possible.
2. In a small bowl whisk olive oil and vinegar together.
3. Place zucchini in a large bowl and toss with oil and vinegar.
4. Add zucchini in even layers to dehydrator then sprinkle with coarse sea salt.
5. Depending on how thin you sliced the zucchini drying time will vary, anywhere from 8 to ­14 hours.
7. Store chips in an airtight container

To make in the oven: Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Lay zucchini evenly. Bake at 200 degrees for 2 to ­3 hours. Rotate half way through cooking time.

salt and vinegar zucchini healthy snack

salt and vinegar zucchini chips healthy snack

SaveSave

Baked Parmesan Zucchini

Baked Parmesan Zucchini

Baked Parmesan Zucchini Recipe

Crisp, tender zucchini sticks oven-roasted to absolute perfection. It’s healthy, nutritious and completely addictive!

Zucchini and parmesan cheese. It’s a match made in heaven. And if all veggies were like this, I’d become a vegetarian tomorrow.

No, but really, this is by far one of the best veggie side dishes I’ve ever made. And the best part about this is that there is absolutely no deep frying or sauteing of any kind.

Simply cut your zucchini into quarters lengthwise, sprinkle on that Parmesan goodness and throw into the oven to let it get nice and crisp.

I like to let mine broil the last couple of minutes to get that nice golden brown crust. It’s so good, even your picky eaters will be begging for seconds and thirds!

Yield: 4 servings

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

INGREDIENTS:

  • 4 zucchini, quartered lengthwise
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley leaves

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Coat a cooling rack with nonstick spray and place on a baking sheet; set aside.
  2. In a small bowl, combine Parmesan, thyme, oregano, basil, garlic powder, salt and pepper, to taste.
  3. Place zucchini onto prepared baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with Parmesan mixture. Place into oven and bake until tender, about 15 minutes. Then broil for 2-3 minutes, or until crisp and golden brown.
  4. Serve immediately, garnished with parsley, if desired.
Simple Baked Spinach & Eggs is What’s For Breakfast

Simple Baked Spinach & Eggs is What’s For Breakfast

Writing of hot breakfasts and eggs – here’s a very easy dish that you can prepare in minutes. Love this breakfast anytime! This simple breakfast of baked eggs with wilted baby spinach is high in vitamin A, C, Folate, Manganese and Potassium.

Ingredients

6 cups firmly packed baby spinach or 1 (10 oz or up to 1 lb) bag fresh baby spinach
4 eggs (can increase to 6 if you are using more spinach)
Salt and freshly Ground Pepper, to taste
1 Tbsp crumbled Feta Cheese for 1-2 eggs (about 2-3 Tbps in total) (also try with Gruyere)
A little olive oil or olive oil butter for greasing your ramekins or baking dish.

Fresh-spinach-in-a-bowl
Procedure

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Grease with a little olive oil individual ramekins or other small oven safe dishes that can accomodate 1-2 eggs.
Place the spinach in a deep skillet or a large frying pan. Add a little water (2-3 Tablespoons). Using medium heat, cook the spinach just until wilted, roughly 3-4 minutes. Use either your hand or a spatula to pack in the spinach. Drain the excess water well especially if you are using  frozen spinach.

Distribute the spinach evenly among the prepared ramekins or oven-safe dishes.

Crack 1-2 eggs on top of the spinach. Season lightly with salt and pepper – lightly because Feta cheese is pretty salty on its own. Sprinkle the crumbled feta cheese on top.

Place the baking dishes or ramekins on a cookie sheet and bake for about 15-18 minutes or until the eggs are set/cooked (whites are set and yolks look firm on the edges) to your liking. I like mine well-done but some like eggs that are a little runny. Whatever you like as long as the eggs are susbtantially cooked inside.

Serve with some toasted sourdough bread on the side. A healthy breakfast that will keep you going for hours! Enjoy!

baked-spinach-eggs

4 Sneaky Sources Of Sugar!

4 Sneaky Sources Of Sugar!

Life is sweet, all right—so sweet that that the typical person will consume about 13 percent of their daily calories from added sugar, or sugar that doesn’t occur naturally in food.1 Compare that to the maximum of 5 percent of daily calories, or about 6 teaspoons, that the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends, and it’s clear that our diets are a bit too sweet.2

One regular soda may have as much as 45 grams (11 teaspoons) of sugar, which is nearly double the recommended upper limit recommended by the World Health Organization. A 32-ounce serving of sweet tea contains 70 grams (17 teaspoons)!

And the not-so-sweet news is that high intakes of added sugars can sour your health. Beyond the concern over raising the risk for type 2 diabetes and weight gain, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) discovered that people who obtained 10-24 percent of their calories from added sugar were 30 percent more likely to die from heart disease than those who consumed less.3

Unfortunately, cutting back isn’t as easy as ditching obvious sources such as sodas and Cap’n Crunch. According to a study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, about 75 percent of packaged foods on store shelves now contain some sort of added sweetness.4 Even if you’re making a conscious effort to stay away from traditional dessert-like items, you can still find just as much sugar in the so-called “healthy” snacks that rule the interior aisles of the grocery store.

It’s clear that food manufacturers want you to eat felonious amounts of sugar, even if you bid adieu to dessert. And it seems they’re spreading it across all kinds of seemingly innocent foods to deliver it to you.

Don’t be an accessory to that crime and fall prey to these sneaky sugar smugglers. Here are four sneaky sources of sugar to watch out for!

It’s easy to become overwhelmed by the vast array of yogurt options now available in the dairy aisle. And if you don’t choose carefully, you could end up spooning enough of the sweet stuff to make it a challenge to hold on to your abs. Case in point: vanilla-flavored yogurt.

While it may seem healthier than fruit-on-the-bottom versions, vanilla yogurt can be just as much of a sugar bomb. Typically, a serving of vanilla yogurt contains three times as much sugar as its plain counterpart. In fact, up to half of the calories in a nonfat vanilla Greek yogurt can come from added sweetness.

Sweet Nothings: To help keep your sugar intake in check, stick to a yogurt with a label that says “plain.” If you are yearning for that warming vanilla flavor, simply add a splash of pure vanilla extract. And of course, if you’re striving to look like a Greek god or goddess, be sure to grab protein-packed plain Greek yogurt instead of regular yogurt.

Cow’s-milk alternatives have become supermarket staples. Whether you follow a vegan diet, are lactose intolerant, or are simply looking to shake it up, there are plenty of plant-based milk options for you to choose from.

While it may come as no surprise that chocolate or vanilla flavors also bring with them gut-busting sugars, what is less obvious is the sugar added to those labeled “original.” The vast majority of original milk alternatives have an ingredient list that contains a sweetener such as evaporated cane juice—just another euphemism for sugar.

yogurt

Sweet Nothings: If you include these drinks in your diet, select those that contain the word “unsweetened” on the package. Do so, and you’ll take in 6-7 times less of the sweet stuff.

Staple peanut butter brands have long been known to infuse sugar and other sweet derivatives into their nut butters, but even more upscale brands are becoming known for their added sugary goodness. In recent years, the market has exploded with various guises of nut butters. Yes, I’m talking about your favorite chocolate coconut butter and white chocolate peanut butter treats.

Sure, the sweeteners they use might be stuff like fruit-juice concentrate, maple syrup, or honey, but your body essentially breaks it down just like table sugar. In fact, a 2015 Journal of Nutrition study found that honey produces similar alarming metabolic effects—such as increased inflammation and blood triglycerides—as sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup when consumed in the same amounts.5 Both of those unwelcome metabolic effects raise your risk for heart disease.

Given that one serving—which is one bite—may contain upwards of 15 grams, it may be best to stick with a simpler version of delightful nut butter. And no, I’m not talking about the reduced-fat nut spreads. Such products often contain more sugar to make up for the loss of flavor when fats are stripped away.

Sweet Nothings: Nut butters can deliver some great stuff like healthy fats and must-have vitamins and minerals, but to make sure these come without the sugary baggage, read the ingredient label. You basically just want nuts and perhaps a touch of salt or other flavorings like cinnamon or cocoa.

Don’t forget that the other common red sauce—ketchup—is also a frequent sugar smuggler, containing 4-6 grams per tablespoon!

Mama Mia, shouldn’t tomato sauce just be, well, tomatoes? Sadly, this is another example of how some food companies are trying their darnedest to keep your diet nice and sweet. Manufacturers add sugar to extend shelf life, reduce acidity, and help mask the lack of natural sweetness present in the less-than-stellar tomatoes jammed into the jars or cans.

Some of the sugar listed on the nutrition panel of tomato sauce is naturally present in tomatoes. However, if the number starts moving well past a couple of grams, it’s a good tip-off the brand has pumped in extra.

peanut-butter

Sweet Nothings: Luckily, plenty of tomato-sauce options on store shelves contain no added sugar, but finding them requires some label-sleuthing. You can also buy plain canned diced tomatoes (Italian-style San Marzano tomatoes are the gold standard for sauces) and rustle up your own sauce by simmering the tomatoes with seasonings like onion, garlic, smoked paprika and basil.

To avoid falling into a sugar trap, you first have to become familiar with all the code words for it that can populate ingredient lists. Some may sound healthier than others, but once they pass your lips, there is not that much difference in how they work in the body.

Use this list to diligently inspect labels, and never mind whether a labels says something like “no sugar added”. You’ve got to read the ingredient list to know for sure.

 

sugar-tomato-sauce

Use this list to diligently inspect labels, and never mind whether a labels says something like “no sugar added”. You’ve got to read the ingredient list to know for sure.

  • Agave
  • Barley malt
  • Brown rice syrup
  • Cane sugar
  • Corn syrup
  • Date sugar
  • Dextrose
  • Evaporated cane juice
  • Fructose
  • Fruit juice concentrate
  • High-fructose corn syrup
  • Honey
  • Invert sugar
  • Maltodextrin
  • Maltose
  • Molasses
  • Sucrose
  • Sorghum syrup
Costco Working Hard to get more Organics

Costco Working Hard to get more Organics

Costco Shopping Organic Produce

To boost its supply of organic foods, Costco is trying something new: It’s working with farmers to help them buy land and equipment as it struggles to keep pace with customer demand.

At Costco’s recent shareholder meeting, CEO Craig Jelinek touted the vast amounts of food the company sold last year, from 83 million rotisserie chickens to $6.1 billion worth of produce.

As for organics, one of the fastest-growing categories in food sales and one in which Costco has become a major player?

“We cannot get enough organics to stay in business day in and day out,” Jelinek told the gathered investors.

Among the initiatives:

• Lending money to farmers to buy land to grow organics

• Raising chickens at its poultry plant in Alabama

• Working with Mexican vendor to get wild shrimp

• Contracting with Nebraskan farmers to raise cattle on organic fields

So to boost its supply, Costco is trying something new: It’s working with farmers to help them buy land and equipment to grow organics.

The effort is still in its infancy. So far, Costco is working with just one partner, loaning money to help San Diego-based Andrew and Williamson Fresh Produce buy equipment and 1,200 acres of land in the Mexican state of Baja California.

But Costco is looking at expanding the initiative. The idea is to ensure a greater supply of organic foods at a time when demand is soaring but supply has not kept up.

While other retailers might have loan programs for suppliers to upgrade equipment or offer financial incentives such as advance payments or long-term contracts, helping farmers buy land to grow organics appears to be unusual in the industry.

The nascent program joins a list of other Costco food initiatives that try to ensure the warehouse giant can meet the voluminous demand of its customers.

The Issaquah-based retailer, for instance, has a poultry plant in Alabama dedicated to raising chickens for the fresh meat and rotisserie chickens it sells.

It started working with a Mexican vendor two years ago to get wild shrimp from the Sea of Cortez, allowing the retailer to diversify from relying on shrimp caught in Thailand, where human trafficking and slave labor in the fishing industry are pervasive.

And in the last year, Costco bought cattle and is contracting with owners of organic fields in Nebraska to have ranchers there raise the livestock to ensure supply for its organic ground-beef program.

Costco Organic Baby Spinach

“A few years ago, Craig [Jelinek] came to me and said: ‘Fresh food — we need to have sustainable lines of supplies into the future,’ ” said Jeff Lyons, Costco’s senior vice president of fresh foods.

Behind each of the initiatives, Lyons said, are the questions: “What do we see down the road that could be a challenge in terms of supply? And what can we put in place today to grow that particular scarce resource?”

Organic food is one such scarce resource, its supply limited in part because the transition from conventional farming to organic farming takes several years and is costly. Virgin land that is ready to grow organics is scarce or prohibitively expensive.

Demand, meanwhile, has leapt with sales of organic food jumping from $11.13 billion in 2004 to $35.95 billion in 2014, according to the Organic Trade Association, which represents the supply chain from farmers to retailers.

“Demand is increasing. But we’re not seeing the same level of farmland,” said association spokeswoman Angela Jagiello.

While organic-food sales reached nearly 5 percent of total food sales last year, organic farmland makes up only about 1 percent of U.S. farm acreage.

“We’re not seeing the level of growth we need in domestic supply to meet demand,” Jagiello said. “It’s the No. 1 strategic issue facing the industry.”

So stretched is the supply chain that some organic packaged-food companies, such as Nature’s Path and Pacific Foods, have bought their own farms or are raising their own chickens, according to The Wall Street Journal. Restaurant chain Chipotle Mexican Grill, meanwhile, began providing financing to help farmers shift from conventional to organic food, the newspaper reported.

Fresh organic produce at Costco

For Costco, the idea of loaning money to longtime supplier Andrew and Williamson Fresh Produce (A&W for short) took shape when Lyons took a tour of A&W’s Baja operations.

The supplier had heard about 1,200 acres of land in San Quintin, Baja California, that seed company Seminis wanted to sell.

The land had lain fallow for years, so it could be used immediately to grow organics, said Ernie Farley, one of A&W’s owners.

A&W, which had experience growing organic strawberries, raspberries, blackberries and tomatoes, told Lyons it wanted to pursue buying the land. The availability of this much land, not to mention that it could grow organics right away, was rare along the Pacific Coast, where acreage is often grabbed by developers.

But money was an issue. A&W didn’t have all the cash on hand it would need to buy the land outright.

And more recently, A&W has been dealing with fallout of a salmonella outbreak linked to cucumbers produced in Baja California and distributed by A&W that infected 888 people in 39 states, hospitalized 191, and resulted in six deaths in four states. (Costco says that outbreak would not have affected cucumbers it sells, since it carries only hothouse cucumbers; the ones linked to the outbreak were field grown.)

Lyons was supportive of A&W’s desire to buy the land, Farley recalls, and said that it made sense strategically for Costco to get involved, given the growing demand for organics and Costco’s desire to attract and retain customers over the next decades.

Costco ended up loaning A&W money to buy the land — neither company would say how much — and the deal is being completed.

Going forward, Costco will have first right to everything that meets its requirements that comes off that land.

In addition, Costco loaned A&W money to buy equipment to grow organic raspberries on another piece of land, also in San Quintin, that A&W is leasing.

“By helping them with financing, we got access to and purchased about 145,000 cases of organic raspberries that we normally would not have access to,” Lyons said. “Because they normally would not have done the deal or could not have done it. Or, if they could have, we may not have gotten first dibs.”

Costco is considering doing something similar with other companies, including a large group with operations in Chile and Mexico.

“There are lots of discussions going on,” Lyons said. “The challenge for the farmer is: ‘We may go down this road and what happens if something bad happens?’ We have to make sure we don’t get them in a position of financial trouble. We need to make sure the loans are totally secure. If it doesn’t work out for them, we want to continue to buy conventional from them to make sure they’re A-OK.”

Part of the reason the supply of organic foods is so limited is that it’s onerous to transition from conventional to organic farming.

“Traditional ag is the way it is because it yields more, which leads to less expensive food,” said Will Rodger, director of policy communications with the American Farm Bureau.

Transitioning to organic farming takes three years — the window set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for pesticides and other nonorganic substances to wash away from the soil. The switch often also requires new equipment and new processes to grow and manage the crops.

“The difficulty is that in this three-year window, you’re using organic methods but you’re only getting conventional prices for what you’re selling,” Rodger said. “The margins right now are better on organic produce. But you have to take that three-year hit.”

Some natural-food retailers have their own programs to help suppliers or to preserve farmland.

Whole Foods, for instance, has had since 2006 a loan program to help its local producers grow their businesses. About $18 million has been lent so far, for everything from helping farmers buy equipment to building greenhouses and packing facilities, according to the company.

PCC Natural Markets, meanwhile, supports preservation of farmland through PCC Farmland Trust, which the Seattle-based co-op founded in 1999.

The trust is independent of the co-op, though PCC’s annual support for it exceeds $100,000. The trust has worked to conserve more than 1,600 acres of Washington farmland, according to PCC. Some of the crops grown on those lands end up being sold by PCC, but that is not a requirement.

Aside from Whole Foods and now Costco, “it’s very uncustomary in the [food] industry for retailers to provide capital to suppliers,” especially given the industry’s thin margins, said Burt Flickinger III, retail analyst with Strategic Research Group.

And he’s not heard of any that provide loans for land.

Doing so “secures Costco a long-term supply, rather than having that land be developed or have that farmer or food producer be selling to Costco competitors,” Flickinger said. “This way, Costco strategically locks in a long-term, high-quality source of supply which its competitors will not have access to.”

That’s important because Costco has become one of the nation’s biggest sellers of organic food.

In 2014, for the first time, conventional retailers such as Costco, Wal-Mart and Kroger bested natural-food retailers, including Whole Foods, in sales of organic foods, according to the Organic Trade Association.

And last year, after Costco said its sales of organic products exceeded $4 billion annually, one investment bank surmised the warehouse giant may have surpassed Whole Foods to become the nation’s largest organic grocer.

Flickinger says that, at the least, Costco is the top seller nationwide of the types of organic foods it carries. Other retailers, though, carry a broader range of products.

Still, Costco’s increased focus on organics is significant and comes at a time when organic food is the fastest-growing food category, increasing at 8 to 11 percent a year, versus 2 to 2.5 percent for food sales overall, he said.

That Costco is working on increasing its supply of organic foods is good news to Letitia Chapman, who was shopping recently for organic fruits and vegetables at Costco in Seattle.

A few months ago, the sales rep from Seattle decided to start eating more organic food as part of a lifestyle change. While the longtime Costco shopper liked the organic produce she found, sometimes Costco simply doesn’t carry enough organics, she said.

“I tend to end up going to Whole Foods,” she said. “If Costco could get more, that would be awesome.”

Cauliflower Pizza Crust Recipe

Cauliflower Pizza Crust Recipe

baked-crust-cauliflower-pizza-crust

I love pizza and I know I’m not the only one! 🙂 The problem, of course, is all the carbs in the dough. Cauliflower pizza crust doesn’t taste like pizza dough but it definitely tastes like pizza when it’s all put together with your favorite toppings!

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup riced, then cooked cauliflower
1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese
1 egg, beaten
1 tsp italian seasonings
1/2 tsp crushed garlic
1/2 tsp salt
pizza sauce & toppings of your choice

DIRECTIONS:

1. To rice the cauliflower, cut florets into chunks and pulse in a food processor until you see rice-like bits. You could also use a cheese grater to produce the tiny pieces. Do not over process, you don’t want mush.

2. Microwave the riced cauliflower in a bowl for 5-8 minutes depending on your microwave. No need to add water. After microwaving, transfer riced cauliflower to a fine mesh strainer and drain completely, gently pressing out excess water. Once drained, transfer riced cauliflower to a cheesecloth and wrap the sides around the cauliflower while gently pressing out excess water. This drying process is important!

3. One large head of cauliflower will yield about 3 cups of riced cauliflower. Use it to make more pizzas immediately, or store in the refrigerator for 2-3 days.

4. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Spray a cookie sheet with non-stick cooking spray.
In a medium bowl, combine 1 cup riced, cooked cauliflower, 1 egg and your parmesan cheese. Next, add Italian seasonings, crushed garlic and salt. Making sure everything is well mixed, place your “dough” on the cookie sheet and pat out a 9″ round. Be sure not to press it too thin as it’s easy to create holes.

5. Bake your dough at 450 degrees for 15 minutes.

6. Remove from oven. Add sauce, mozzarella cheese, and your favorite pre-cooked toppings to your pizza. Place pizza under broiler just until cheese is melted, be sure to keep an eye on it!

dry-cauliflower-with-cheesecloth-pizza-crust-recipe

squeezed-cauliflower

flattened-cauliflower-pizza-crust-recipe

Proline Expert Thomas DeLauer’s 7-Day Anti-Inflammatory Reboot

Proline Expert Thomas DeLauer’s 7-Day Anti-Inflammatory Reboot

Proline Expert Thomas DeLauer’s 7-Day
Anti-Inflammatory Reboot

Inflammation is holding us back in so many ways, and no one is really explaining it to us. All we know is that it’s “bad,” but no one wants to tell us about how it’s keeping us from losing weight and how it’s making us feel like garbage. Mainly because the food lobbyists don’t want us to dip into their profits when we find out that inflammation is caused by most of the so-called healthy foods that we are eating now!

Thomas DeLauer Before After Diet Pics

*IMPORTANT: My results are not typical. As with any weight loss program, your results may vary greatly.

When I was 275lbs and struggling with my weight, the last thing that I thought about was inflammation causing my problems… I had always resorted to the basics… simple calories in vs. calories out to lose weight, BUT that was NOT the case here. There was something bigger at play because I was literally doing everything that I was ‘supposed’ to do.

Dangerous GMO corn

Meanwhile, my wife was diagnosed with an auto-immune disease that effected her thyroid (hashimoto’s) and later, Lyme disease. It was the serendipitous timing of this that made me realize that inflammation might be playing a larger role then I had thought. I’m sure many of you have heard of these diseases, and the scary thing is that they can be affecting you and you might not even know it!

To make a very long story short, I began learning about inflammation, using my resources within the healthcare industry to dive into some heavy research on how inflammation works and how it could be holding my wife and I (and others) from living the lives that we wanted to live. Like so many others, it’s easy to not even realize you’re being held back.

I found that inflammation can cause all kinds of issues in the digestive tract making it so that you’re not absorbing nutrients. This was a HUGE step, because I WAS eating healthy, but I couldn’t lose weight at all! So when I realized that there were specific “health foods” that I was eating that were causing this to happen, it all made sense….

read more: Learn what these health foods are

If you’re not absorbing nutrients, then you body goes into starvation mode and that means that you will store fat! It’s a simple survival mechanism! This was the code that needed to be cracked! I needed to find a way to reduce the activity of the COX-1 enzyme and the production of prostaglandins (a fancy way of saying ‘how inflammation is caused”)

Thomas DeLauer Diet Plan

But the difficulty was finding a way to rid my body of the inflammation so that I could begin absorbing nutrients again. And back then, this was a long drawn out process, simply because the science wasn’t really there at the time. Most of us don’t really have the time or the energy to devote to experimenting with different foods to find what works for them.

Well, I did reduce my inflammation, and I was able to get back on track and ultimately become on author on this very topic, but it took a lot of time.

So over the past six months, using my experiences and my research I have developed a way to reduce inflammation within the body and to help the body absorb nutrients again, all with a WHOLE FOODS approach. As someone that has been in the healthcare industry before, I wanted to make sure this was a down-to-earth way to reduce inflammation.

Anyhow, it has been awesome to see how many people have been having success and not just reducing inflammation, but truly losing weight and kick starting their new lives feeling utterly amazing!

I want to invite you to take a look at the full protocol and the actual program and steps that you need to take right here

Just seeing some of the pain being lifted from people and seeing them realize what had been causing them so much grief before…

Thomas DeLauer Diet Plan Happy Customer Testimonials

*IMPORTANT: Results are not typical. As with any weight loss program, your results may vary greatly.

Thomas DeLauer 7-Day Anti-Inflammation Reboot

*IMPORTANT: Results are not typical. As with any weight loss program, your results may vary greatly.

Anyhow, you’ve all been so good to me by watching my videos and reading my articles, I thought that this would be a great special opportunity for you to get this reboot system, so head on over and check it out here – Thank you! Thomas Delauer

Apple Pomegranate Fall Salad

Apple Pomegranate Fall Salad

Serving: 4
Ingredients:
1 cup honey roasted pecan (see recipe below)
1/2 cup citrus champagne vinaigrette dressing (see recipe below)
4 boiled eggs, thinly sliced or halved
1/2 apple, peeled and thinly sliced
1/4 pomegranate, peeled
8 cups green mix (organic baby spinach, arugula, organic baby romaine lettuce, organic baby chard)
Feta cheese crumbs (optional)

Honey Roasted Pecan
1 cup pecan, halved
1 tbsp butter
1 tbsp honey

Citrus Champagne Vinaigrette Dressing
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/2 cup citrus champagne muscat vinegar
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 tsp mustard seed powder
3 basil leaves, finely chopped

Preparation:

Honey Roasted Pecan
Pre-heat oven to 375F. Place pecans in an even layer on baking sheet. Roast about 9 – 11 minutes. Set aside.

In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter. Add honey and combine. Add pecan and stir until mixture simmers and foams, about 3 – 5 minutes. Remove from heat. Transfer to a baking sheet lined with wax paper. Separate the pecan to avoid clumps. Cool completely.

Citrus Champagne Vinaigrette
Pour oil and vinegar into a container. Add garlic, mustard powder and basil. Mix until all ingredients combine. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes before serving.

Apple Pomegranate Fall Salad
In a salad bowl, add spring mix. Layer honey roasted pecans, eggs and apple slices. Sprinkle pomegranate and cheese on top. Pour vinaigrette dress. Toss and combine. Serve.

Juicing to Relieve Headaches or Migraines

Juicing to Relieve Headaches or Migraines

MIGRAINE RELIEVER JUICE RECIPE RICH IN MAGNESIUM, CALCIUM AND POTASSIUM

If you’re experiencing chronic migraines it could be due to what you’re eating. Some of the foods that trigger migraines:  Fried foods, sugar, artificial sweeteners, flour based products, dairy products, alcohol, caffeine, food additives, chocolate and some nuts or seeds.

A diet high in complex carbohydrates (whole grains and starchy vegetables) and low in protein is recommended for headache sufferers.

Most of the time, a migraine is the body’s way of signalling that it is dehydrated. Drink plenty of water, fresh fruit and vegetable juices to rid the body of the toxins that are the main culprit of headaches.

Most fruits and vegetables are rich in three very important minerals that help remedy migraines, namely: Potassium, calcium and magnesium. Some foods that especially help: Dark green vegetables, bananas, cantaloupe, celery, cucumber, lemon, pineapple, watermelon, and ginger.

1/2 pineapple
3-4 leaves kale or a bunch of spinach
1 stick of celery
1/2 cucumber
1/4 lemon
1/2 inch ginger root (optional)

And drink plenty of [eafl id=1053 name=”Perfect Water Purifier – articleLink2″ text=”filtered water”]!

 

Zucchini Pizza Crust

Zucchini Pizza Crust

Inspired by sheknows

Yields 4

Ingredients:

  • 5 cups fresh zucchini, shredded
  • 1/2 cup pepper Jack, mozzarella or cheddar cheese
  • 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 cup almond flour or other desired flour
  • 1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 egg

Pizza toppings, as desired

  • Extra cheese
  • Tomato sauce
  • Fresh vegetables
  • Pepperoni
  • Sausage
  • Olives
  • Peppers
  • Onions
  • Fresh herbs
  • Pineapples

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F, and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Place the zucchini in a microwave-safe bowl, and cook on high for 5 minutes. Allow to cool, and then place the zucchini in a colander lined with paper towels. Twist the paper towels and squeeze as much of the water from the zucchini as possible.
  3. In a mixing bowl, add the zucchini, egg, cheeses, almond flour and seasonings. Mix very well, and place on the baking sheet. Shape the mixture into the desired pizza shape, and bake for 20 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from the oven.
  4. Top with desired sauce and toppings, and return the pizza to the oven. Bake for an additional 10 minutes or until the cheese is melted and bubbly. Best served immediately.